Tag Archives: Game Jam

CFP: ICGJ- International Conference on Game Jams, Hackathons, and Game Creation Events

The International Conference on Game Jams, Hackathons, and Game Creation Events is a peer reviewed academic conference occurring annually. The conference proceedings are published though the Association of Computing Machinery’s digital library (ACM digital Library).

DETAILS: http://icgj17.gameconf.org/

Calls for Participation

 

  • Long and Short Papers

    We invite contributions on all aspects of game creation events using scholarly methods. Descriptions of new algorithms, processes and scientific findings as well as empirical studies of implementations and applications are welcome. Submissions can be full papers about results from novel research (up to 8 pages long) or short papers describing works in progress (up to 4 pages long).

  • Late-Breaking Papers

    We invite scholars to submit papers that are relatively complete, but depend on data from the 2017 Global Game Jam. These papers will need to be scientific and be well written. Papers will be reviewed on their relevance to the conference, clarity of writing and presentation, and their “in-progress” nature. Late breaking papers should be considered short papers for the purposes of length and submission system. Note: Only selected late breaking papers will be published in the proceedings.

Organizing Committee

Conference Chairs

Proceedings Chair

Program Committee

    • Alexey Izvalov, Kirovograd Flight Academy of the National Aviation University, Ukraine
    • Ali Arya, Carleton University, Canada
    • Drew Davidson, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
    • Foaad Khosmood, California Polytechnic State University, USA
    • Gillian Smith, Northeastern University, USA
    • Johanna Pirker, Graz University of Technology, Austria
    • Jon Preston, Kennesaw State University, USA
    • Michael Adrir Scott, Falmouth University, UK
    • Peter Smith, University of Central Florida, USA

DETAILS: http://icgj17.gameconf.org/

Working Group @ ACM ITICSE 2016: Game Jam Junior Working Group Education

Working Group 7: Game Jam Junior Working Group Education

Details: http://ucsp.edu.pe/iticse2016/working-groups/

Working Group Leaders:

  • Allan Fowler – Kennesaw State University, USA –  afowle56@kennesaw.edu
  • Johanna Pirker – Graz University of Technology, Austria
  • Bruno Campagnolo de Paula – Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná, Brazil

ABSTRACT

Game Jam Junior is designed to introduce young learners to computer science concepts in a fun and engaging way. Through introducing these concepts at an early age in an entertaining way, it is possible to influence or improve perceptions of computer science as a career. In this working group, we will discuss the potential of Game Jam Junior.

The scope includes but is not limited to:

  •  Exploring the potential of Game Jam Junior to increase diversity in computer science
  • Establishing Game Jam Junior sites
  • Identifying potential partnerships
  •  Identifying potential research projects at the Game Jam Junior
  • Identifying collaborators and partners for grant applications

Applicants should provide information about their prior experiences in organizing game jams or outreach programs involving K-12 students.

CFP: ICGJ 2016, SAN FRANCISCO, 13 MARCH 2016.

First-ever International Conference on Game Jams, Hackathons, and Game Creation Events (ICGJ 2016)

Following up from our very successful series of workshops in the past few years, we are pleased to announce the first-ever International Conference on Game Jams, Hackathons, and Game Creation Events (ICGJ 2016).

This will be a one-day conference held on March 13, 2016.

Game jams and Hackathons have become popular activities with their own unique culture and communities. Often held in a confined space for a limited duration of time, these activities offer enormous technological and social benefits for their many participants. Studies of these events can be conducted around the technical creation aspect of the activity, as well as its social and educational dynamics The research area now has a diverse and dedicated following of scholars.

Full and short papers

We invite contributions on all aspects of game creation events using scholarly methods. Descriptions of new algorithms, processes and scientific findings as well as empirical studies of implementations and applications are welcome. Submissions can be full papers about results from novel research (up to 8 pages long) or short papers describing works in progress (up to 4 pages long).

 Position papers

As the scholarship of game creation events is in its very early stages, we welcome submission of position papers on major themes or directions of this field. Though essentially opinion based, the position paper submissions should nevertheless contain research with arguments fully supported by specific references. Position papers should considered short papers for the purposes of length and submission system.

 Showcase presentations

We invite contributions from the creators of games and apps that were created in a recent game jam or hackathon. The creator(s) are required to submit a demonstration of their game and a written synopsis of the game. The creator(s) of the game will be provided the opportunity to demonstrate the game at the conference. The synopsis should be limited to one page. The synopsis will be published as part of the proceedings. These submissions will be editorially (non-peer) reviewed.

TOPICS

The topics can include (but are not limited to):

  • Communication skills
  • Community building
  • Creativity
  • Game design issues in Game jams
  • Game jam attendance: who and why?
  • Game jam impacts
  • Game jam methodologies
  • Group dynamics
  • Hackathons
  • Ideation
  • Learning in game jams
  • Maker spaces
  • Rapid application development
  • Team formation
  • Tools and technologies

Organizing Committee

PROGRAM CHAIR

  • Allan Fowler – Kennesaw State University, USA

Conference Chairs

  • Allan Fowler – Kennesaw State University, USA
  • Foaad Khosmood – California Polytechnic State University, USA

Proceedings Chair

  • Foaad Khosmood – California Polytechnic State University, USA

Program CommitteeAli Arya, Carleton University, Canada

  • Allan Fowler, Kennesaw State University, USA.
  • Annakaisa Kultima, University of Tampere, Finland
  • Brian McDonald, Glasgow Caledonian University, Scotland
  • Foaad Khosmood, California Polytechnic State University, USA.
  • Johanna Pirker, Graz University of Technology, Austria.
  • Jon Preston, Kennesaw State University, USA
  • Menno Deen, Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands.
  • Mirjam Eladhari, University of Malta, Malta
  • Nia Wearn, Staffordshire University, UK
  • Ryan J Locke, Abertay University, Scotland
  • William Goddard, RMIT University, Australia

Awards

At the end of the conference, there will be a short awards ceremony. The awards are:

  • Best full paper award
  • Best short paper award
  • Best showcase presentation award

IMPORTANT DATES

Paper submission due 5 February 2016
Showcase submission due 2 February 2016
Notification of decisions 29 February 2016
Camera ready due 6 March 2016
Registration due 4 March 2016
Conference dates 13 March  2016

Paper Submission

Authors are invited to submit original research contributions, following the instructions below:

Remove author names, and any additional information in the paper that could be used to identify the paper authors. Any submissions that are not formatted to the ACM specification or include any author identification will be returned to the authors. Submissions must be in PDF format and follow ACM SIG proceedings format.

Papers should be submitted to the conference Easychair site.

All papers are peer reviewed and will be published in the ICGJ 2016 Conference Proceedings and included in the ACM Digital Library.
If you have any questions regarding the submission process, please use the following email address:

Registration

Registration is via Eventbright. 

Date and Location

March 13, 2016. David Brower Center, Berkeley, California

Contact

Please feel free to contact us through foaad@calpoly.edu

European Youth Award Game Jam 2015 May 29-31 in Graz

EYA is organizing a game jam to gather young creative minds for the purpose of planning, designing, and creating games within a short span of time.

The EYA Game Jam is two and a half days long and will take place in Graz, UNESCO City of Design & Human Rights, from May 29-31. EYA invites people with all kinds of backgrounds (be it programmers, game designers, artists, business students or others who are simply interested in being innovative and creating something new) to participate and enjoy productive collaboration and creativity with others. The EYA game jam themes will focus on social good and also will be aligned with Jam Today’s special topics. Find out what they are in the first hour!

Check out the detailed program here. (May 29-31)

Order your ticket here! (15€)

2ND KLAGENFURT GAME JAM

2ND KLAGENFURT GAME JAM

Link: http://itec.aau.at/gamejam/

  • Date: 17th April – 19th April, 2015
  • Time: 48h, see program!
  • Location: Alpen-Adria Universität Klagenfurt
  • E 2.42

The 2nd Klagenfurt Game Jam is open to everyone who likes games and wants to create, test and talk about games. Starting on Friday the topic will be revealed to all participants at the same time and random groups will brainstorm games. Then, after the ideas are pitched, team will emerge around ideas and games are to be created. Finally, on Sunday, the projects are presented to a jury and a price for the most awesome project is awarded.

The game jam is not restricted to game designers or programmers, but is open to everyone who wants to build games. Each team is in desperate need for visual and audio artist, animation experts, web page writers, storytellers, testers, …

Call for Papers: Workshop on Game Jams, Hackathons and Game Creation Events (co- located with FDG 2015)

Overview

Game jams, hackathons and similar group game creation events have become increasingly popular. They provide convenient environments for collaborative game development throughout the world. These events are run in a variety of ways, formats, and have differing time constraints. However, what they have in common are new and exciting opportunities for education and research.

The interest in studying game jams has reached significant levels. Such research has been evolving for the past few years, extending and modifying existing methodologies used to understand the complexities of game development within a rapid-prototyping framework. This workshop, closely associated with the Global Game Jam Community, will bring together academics from these various consortia to discuss and to further the understanding of game jams and the potential they offer participants and academics. This workshop will take place at the International Conference on Foundations of Digital Games 2015 (http://www.fdg2015.org/)

Important Dates:

  • Submission deadline: 1 May 2015*
  • Decision notification: 15 May 2015
  • Camera-ready deadline: 22 May 2015

* Submissions for in-progress work are welcome

Workshop Organization

The workshop will consist of two key activities: paper presentations and group discussion. The morning session will be set aside for the paper presentations and discussion. This time will also provide for discussion and debate that will result from the paper presentations. The afternoon session will involve breakout sessions where all workshop participants will discuss their experience and develop methodologies for future research. The research paper program will consist of short papers (4 pages) and full papers (8 pages) selected via a double blind peer-reviewed process. Since the workshop is intended to explore new ideas and directions, submission of incomplete and in-progress results are encouraged.

Research Areas

Papers may be about a variety of topics, including but not limited to

  • Creativity
  • Game Jam attendance: who and why?
  • Learning in game jams
  • Community building
  • Game design issues in Game Jams
  • Methods and processes
  • Tools and technologies
  • Game Jam impacts

Submission Instructions

Submissions to the GJ2015 workshop must be in PDF format and follow ACM SIG conference formatting guidelines. Papers should be submitted here using the Easychair submission system.

All accepted papers will be published as part of the conference proceedings.

Organizers

  • Alexander Zook, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA.
  • Allan Fowler, Waiariki Institute of Technology, New Zealand.
  • Foaad Khosmood, California Polytechnic State University, USA.
  • Johanna Pirker, Graz University of Technology, Austria.
  • Menno Deen, Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands.
  • Mirjam Eladhari, University of Malta, Malta
  • Nia Wearn, Staffordshire University, UK.

Contact

For more information, contact Allan Fowler, allan(dot)fowler(at)waiariki.ac.nz

Website: globalgamejam.org/workshop2015

Global Game Jam Graz 2015

Zur Eröffnung der Global Game Jam 2015 wird es heuer auch Talks von Entwicklern und Forschern im Bereich Game Development und IT geben. Die Vorträge sind für alle (auch nicht Game Jam Teilnehmer) offen! Also unbedingt vorbeikommen!

23.01.2015
14:00 – 17:30 Hörsaal i11, Inffeldgasse 16b

14:00 – 17:30: Talks, Keynote, offen für Besucher (HS i11)

14:00 – 14:30: Unity Game Development; Rainer Angermann; Rarebyte OG
14:30 – 15:00: Murl Engine: Ein C++ Multimedia Framework; Wolfgang Moser; Spraylight GmbH
15:00 – 15:30: Pause
15:30 – 16:00: Gone: Wie es nach der Game Jam 2014 weiterging; Mathias Lux; ITEC, Universität Klagenfurt
16:00 – 16:30: Erfolgspotential durch Innovation in IT und Gaming; Frank Kappe, Johanna Pirker; IICM, TU Graz
16:30 – 16:45: Pause
16:45 – 17:00: Allgemeine Information zur Global Game Jam
17:00 – 17:30: Offizielle Global Game Jam Video Keynote, Bekanntmachung des Themas

 

Alle Details unter http://www.gamejam.at

September Game Jam Graz 2014

48 hours, 25 jammer, 7 games, 4.8 kg cookies, 4.3 kg choclate, 3.1 kg gummi bears, 18.4 l coffee. This was the September Game Graz 2014.  

As usual it was happening at Graz University of Technology and this time the jam was organized by Johanna Pirker @joeyprink supported by Michael List @scarfront, Matthias Frey @ninjadev, Rainer Angermann @rangermann & Marco Fruhwirth @fruhwirthmarco

This time we had different topics the jammers could chose of:

  • “Winter is coming”
  • “As long as we have each other, we will never run out of problems”*hat
  • Pic of rolled Story Cube Dices
  • Top Hat Jam: *art by @scarfront

 

All games can be found and played here: http://jam.gamelabgraz.com/september-game-jam-2014/


Some impressions:

 

 

10 Tips for a Game Jam.

1. Keep it simple! 

When designing a game which should be delivered in only one weekend it is important to start with simple game mechanics and a feasible storyline.

2. Lack of artists? Stick to 2 Dimensions.

Often game jams lack of artists. When designing your game it might be helpful to stick to two dimensions instead of trying to force a fancy 3D game.

3. Use a simple game engine. 

At a game jam developers with different skills and experience levels are supposed to work together. Hence, even for experienced game developers it might be reasonable to stick to development editors which are easy to learn and use such as GameMaker (https://www.yoyogames.com/studio) or Unity (https://unity3d.com/). This will facilitate not only the development process but also the distribution process (see next point).

4. Make your game playable & distributable.

You want to develop a game for people to play it! It is easier to show the game to friends in a web-browser than on your phone or as an exe which must be downloaded first. Choose the game engine to support your “target” group / platform, or in the best case choose an engine, which already comes with distribution possibilities to several platforms.

5. Hacking is welcome. 

In contrast to traditional coding projects, in a game jam it is absolutely OK to write code which might be not super reusable and is not optimized, nor fully commented. Main goal: In the end it should work. However, it might be helpful if you still try to write code, which is readable for you (if you want to change something, or are looking for bugs) and your team partners.

6. Finish your game!

Goal #1 is to finish your game. Even if you submit a game with minimal functionality, you shipped a working game. Ensure this by prioritizing the game functionalities (from VERY IMPORTANT to NICE TO HAVE) and scheduling them accordingly. Another very imporant tool helping you to achieve this goal is the usage of a subversioning system! (e.g. https://github.com/ or sourceforge.net/) Only submit working versions! This will ensure that you can submit a working version at the end, and also allows other jammers to test your game at different stages (see tip 9).

7. Art can wait. Work with placeholders.

If you are in lack of artists and team members it might be helpful to work with placeholders first and concentrate on the mechanics instead of spending too much time on designing objects and the environment.

8. Audio is more important than you might expect.

Even if it does not appear important during the development phase, audio elements are one of the most important parts of a good game. Even small effects (e.g. jumping sounds) or a nice background music will dramatically change your games’ atmosphere.

9. Test, test, test!

Of course you should test your game for bugs, but don’t forget to test your game for fun! Ask other jammers to play your game to give you tips, and test other games to give tips!

10. Have fun!

Even it is stressful and you lack of sleep and have a pizza and coffee overdose – you should remember the game jam as a fun experience – so avoid arguments with your team mates and don’t forget to stick to regular breaks for food, coffee, and sleep!

Tools & Resources 

Editors: 

Gamemaker or GameSalad(make games without expert programming skills)

– Unity3D (2d and 3d games .. wonderful tutorial for 2d games: http://pixelnest.io/tutorials/2d-game-unity/)

– and lots of other brilliant SDKs for programmers!

Art & Environment: 

– 2D Art:  Photoshop TrialGimp 

– 3D Art: BlenderAutodesk 3ds MAX Trial, Google Sketch Up

– Audio: Audacity

– Download Resources: http://opengameart.org/

In the case these 10 tips were not enough please go and find 16 Tips at: http://gamedevelopment.tutsplus.com/articles/tips-tools-and-resources-for-your-next-game-jam–gamedev-12084